kojotai:

ah, William S. Burroughs. 

Kill Your Darlings (2013)

(via fyodor-haneke)

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Wednesday, 16th April
yourcatwasdelicious:

catherine deneuve

yourcatwasdelicious:

catherine deneuve

(via givemebackmypanties)

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Sunday, 13th April

I’m about to leave. I ask him to take me home. I haven’t ridden pillion for a long time nor have I been this close to a man in ages. The road home isn’t very long, and I know I’ll be getting off soon. But at this moment, I’m feeling such lovely warmth.

(Source: minhorrors)

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Sunday, 13th April
c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 
From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 

From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

(via thedeathoffilm)

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Saturday, 12th April
fohk:

“If memories could be canned, would they also have expiry dates? If so, I hope they last for centuries”
Chungking Express (1994)Kar Wai Wong

fohk:

If memories could be canned, would they also have expiry dates? If so, I hope they last for centuries”

Chungking Express (1994)
Kar Wai Wong

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Saturday, 12th April
fuckyeahexistentialism:

simple answers
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Friday, 11th April

"The fact is, there’s an enigmatic relationship between Max and myself. He has meant a tremendous amount to me. Stravinsky once said something good. I heard Blomdahl and him discussing Alban Berg’s Lulu. They were discussing a singer. Stravinsky said she was a bad Lulu, because she was so vulgar. But then Blomdahl, as I remember it, said: ‘But Lulu’s the vulgarest female alive.’ And Stravinsky said: ‘Yes, and that’s why she must be played by an actress who hasn’t a trace of vulgarity in her—but can play it.’ I suppose that’s exactly what I find in Max von Sydow. As an actor, Max is sound through and through. Robust. Technically durable. If I’d had a psychopath to present these deeply psychopathic roles, it would have been unbearable. It’s a question of acting the part of a broken man, not of being him. The sort of exhibitionism in this respect which is all the rage just now will pass over, I think. By and by people will regain their feeling for the subtle detachment which often exists between Max and my madmen.”
— Ingmar Bergman | 1968
"Mr. Bergman was a man of great working discipline. He forced everyone to concentrate when it was important. No disturbing noise during rehearsal. A code of silence. But in between, when [the camera and lighting] was being changed and re-rigged, there were a lot of laughs and a lot of fun. He had a great sense of humor. He had a talent of making people feel that they were participating in something important and something aspiring. He created teamwork. Mr. Bergman had a great imagination and saw the possibilities within every one of his actors, and he gave us great challenges. It was very inspiring. Whatever good I have done on screen I owe to him. I have learned discipline. I have learned concentration and the joy of acting."
— Max von Sydow | 2013

"The fact is, there’s an enigmatic relationship between Max and myself. He has meant a tremendous amount to me. Stravinsky once said something good. I heard Blomdahl and him discussing Alban Berg’s Lulu. They were discussing a singer. Stravinsky said she was a bad Lulu, because she was so vulgar. But then Blomdahl, as I remember it, said: ‘But Lulu’s the vulgarest female alive.’ And Stravinsky said: ‘Yes, and that’s why she must be played by an actress who hasn’t a trace of vulgarity in her—but can play it.’ I suppose that’s exactly what I find in Max von Sydow. As an actor, Max is sound through and through. Robust. Technically durable. If I’d had a psychopath to present these deeply psychopathic roles, it would have been unbearable. It’s a question of acting the part of a broken man, not of being him. The sort of exhibitionism in this respect which is all the rage just now will pass over, I think. By and by people will regain their feeling for the subtle detachment which often exists between Max and my madmen.”

Ingmar Bergman | 1968

"Mr. Bergman was a man of great working discipline. He forced everyone to concentrate when it was important. No disturbing noise during rehearsal. A code of silence. But in between, when [the camera and lighting] was being changed and re-rigged, there were a lot of laughs and a lot of fun. He had a great sense of humor. He had a talent of making people feel that they were participating in something important and something aspiring. He created teamwork. Mr. Bergman had a great imagination and saw the possibilities within every one of his actors, and he gave us great challenges. It was very inspiring. Whatever good I have done on screen I owe to him. I have learned discipline. I have learned concentration and the joy of acting."

Max von Sydow | 2013

(Source: strangewood)

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Thursday, 10th April

WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL? (2013, dir Shion Sono)

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Wednesday, 9th April

d7ux:

" I’m going South, winters are shorter there. "

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Monday, 7th April